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Nature CHAT

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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Tue Oct 29, 2013 11:36 am

This interview wasn't long enough --- prob. because it was on a book show rather than a natural history one: Prof. Germaine Greer talks about restoring her subtropical rainforest property near Springbrook, SE Qld (ABC podcast).
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Tue Oct 29, 2013 12:16 pm

ThankyouThankyouThankyou, Helix.

Loved it. Downloaded and will listen to it again and again.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Tue Oct 29, 2013 1:36 pm

I remember reading about the property years ago. She had been looking for somewhere to store her archives, but ended up with the least suitable place for paper-based products --- a rainforest. This is the property: Cave Creek Rainforest
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Tue Oct 29, 2013 2:20 pm

Listened to part of this while driving between two farms this morning. Thanks for the whole thing.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:08 pm

Bruddy hell, Twitter's fantastic. I got an ID for a fly in four minutes. Four minutes!

I still find it amazing that people have this notion that Twitter's all cat gifs and ranting nutters.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Sun Nov 03, 2013 6:17 am

Helix wrote:Bruddy hell, Twitter's fantastic. I got an ID for a fly in four minutes. Four minutes!

I still find it amazing that people have this notion that Twitter's all cat gifs and ranting nutters.

Yes, I saw that
:)
Impressively skilled followers too, with reason.

Ian Lundt is onto smething interesting again.
I like his analogy "cruising without a speedo".
http://ianluntecology.com/2013/11/03/th ... -cover-up/
http://freakonomics.com/
We seem to have some firebug activity around the Hills, Three near here in past week; biggish one yesterday in scrub and stubble, now small but still going.

hoping for a shower.

'.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby freak » Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:12 am

Thought I'd pop this in here - Unless there is anyone who wants to take it over, I'm going to delete the Scribblygum Wiki - It's getting some spam, and the domain name is due for re-registration in December. I might leave it up til then, in case anyone wants to grab any mementos from it ... almost all of the links are now broken - the saddest of these being rustic's rambles.

:(

http://scribblygumwiki.net/
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Sun Nov 03, 2013 6:12 pm

freak wrote:Thought I'd pop this in here - Unless there is anyone who wants to take it over, I'm going to delete the Scribblygum Wiki - It's getting some spam, and the domain name is due for re-registration in December. I might leave it up til then, in case anyone wants to grab any mementos from it ... almost all of the links are now broken - the saddest of these being rustic's rambles.

:(

http://scribblygumwiki.net/

Thanks freak, for hanging in there with this.
I'm sorry rustic's work has gone.
It was a great effort wasn't it, especially from booshkie, but many others too.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Mon Nov 04, 2013 1:12 am

justjj wrote:
freak wrote:Thought I'd pop this in here - Unless there is anyone who wants to take it over, I'm going to delete the Scribblygum Wiki - It's getting some spam, and the domain name is due for re-registration in December. I might leave it up til then, in case anyone wants to grab any mementos from it ... almost all of the links are now broken - the saddest of these being rustic's rambles.

:(

http://scribblygumwiki.net/

Thanks freak, for hanging in there with this.
I'm sorry rustic's work has gone.
It was a great effort wasn't it, especially from booshkie, but many others too.



I can only applaud those who put in an effort.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:59 am

All good things....

It was a great effort and a valuable resource.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:14 pm

Thanks for keeping it going for all that time, Freak. Things do have a natural lifespan.

And this is...well...barking. From the link ^^^^

Kraken theory resurfaces with new 'evidence'

A recent fossil find is renewing interest in the search for the ancient giant cephalopod known as the kraken.


No. No, it's not. And the inverted commas around 'evidence' in the title need to be a whole lot bigger. Possibly 'evidence' needs to be in Comic Sans too, I don't know.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:48 pm

Oh FFS!

I can't work out what's worse, that I read the entire article, or that I expected at least a shred of credibility from ABC Science journos. At least they (McMenamin et al.) have the decency to admit that they're FOS.

(Science postgrad): Must publish.....Anything......
(ABC Science): Must publish.................................Anything...................Anything........................Anything...

I'm 18 months out from the end of my contract. I'd send the ABC a CV, although I'd be concerned that they'd accept. If I can convince Mrs T, and unless something decent is available, I think I'll go back to school.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Tue Nov 05, 2013 8:54 am

Teleost wrote:Oh FFS!

I can't work out what's worse, that I read the entire article, or that I expected at least a shred of credibility from ABC Science journos. At least they (McMenamin et al.) have the decency to admit that they're FOS.

(Science postgrad): Must publish.....Anything......
(ABC Science): Must publish.................................Anything...................Anything........................Anything...

I'm 18 months out from the end of my contract. I'd send the ABC a CV, although I'd be concerned that they'd accept. If I can convince Mrs T, and unless something decent is available, I think I'll go back to school.


I often wonder how the real science journos still left at the ABC must be feeling about this kind of thing.
Is it essentially "clickbait" of a kind?

As it turns out, *that* Catalyst programme would seem to be a similar thing.

I watched it on iview and found it really interesting, but kept waiting for Norman Swann's respnse, knowing how hard he works on sussing out treatments and going for iffy stuff (particularly that of mainstream medicine) and boy did he get angry when talking to Fran Kelly on AM yesterday.
Mind you, if she were to interview EVERYONE as steadily as she did Norman then AM would be a better balanced show than it now is too.

Another beautiful day here; hoping there won't be any more fires in the Hills; lots of small ones.
Some of it is people from built up areas not yet got the hang of being close to the bush, I think, and lighting rubbish whenever they feel like it and with no idea how quickly their sparks can cause another fire.

There is also some talk of firebugs, so that's not encouraging.

I was thinking of adding "All good things come to an end" to the thoughts re the wiki, but that's a bit more all-encompassing than I think is needed!
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Mon Nov 11, 2013 1:08 pm

Teleost, how far does this go towards restoring the funding cuts? Is this part of the previous government's funding or is it genuinely something from our current govt? I'm guessing that the $400,000/year would have been a handy top up, but is nowhere near what's required to do this properly. I might be wrong.

Federal Government gives $2m to fight yellow crazy ants south of Cairns

THE war against one of the world's most invasive pests has been given a boost after the Federal Government announced $2 million to fight yellow crazy ants south of Cairns.

[snip]

The money will go towards a five-year eradication program involving baits, research funding and public education and awareness programs.

[snip]

The funding, under the Federal Government's Caring for Our Country grants program, comes 12 months after the State Government and Biosecurity Queensland stopped its eradication program.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Mon Nov 11, 2013 1:54 pm

Some good news for & from here today.

I have just signed and had witnessed by son (who began the restoration work 10 years ago) the final round of contract papers for this bush block to be declared "Heritage Protected".
:)
A long haul, but satisfying.
Apart from that, am back into full swing weeding mode.

Right now, with watsonias having been dealt with, it is blackberry / erica / broome being cut off and painted and lots of the annual grasses to be pulled up.
The ground is still damp, making it easy to manage.

Lunch / Coffee and then back into it!
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Woollybutt » Mon Nov 11, 2013 3:15 pm

justjj wrote:Lunch / Coffee and then back into it!


Stop skiving and get back out there... :)

Feeling a little sad again after writing a tribute to a local identity. Our region has sufferred a big loss, a wonderful and amazing lady passed away a couple of weeks ago. She was a long-time Landcarer who not only devoted her time to getting her hands dirty, she also did invaluable work at local region/committee level. It was very much due to her efforts in gathering and sorting project sheets from all local Landcare groups that allowed us as an overall body to justify funding grants and be able to show how money had been spent in relation to hours and outcomes. Massive gumboots to fill :(

I owe this lady a large personal debt because she was a big influence on my decision to take on my diploma at a time where I was somewhat at a loss over what route to take. In her retirement she decided to go for exactly the same qualification (conservation and land management) as I've beem aiming at, and did it via distance learning (with top marks, unsurprisingly). I was worried I was taking too large a step with my education (going from certificate II to diploma) , but was reassured by her faith in me and the advice and offers of support she freely gave. I'll miss her a lot.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby ms spock » Mon Nov 11, 2013 5:41 pm

So sorry to hear of your loss Woollybutt. :(
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Mon Nov 11, 2013 8:05 pm

Some people are tremendous contributors aren't they.
My bet is that she was as thankful for you guys coming along as you were for her assistance.

That's an honour to write about her for others, I'd think, even if a hard job.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Wed Nov 13, 2013 2:27 pm

Imma gonna leave this here and revisit it later when I feel like concentrating on good stuff. It's a review paper* on the relationship between climate change, adaptation and phenotype in terrestrial invertebrates.

Contemporary climate change and terrestrial invertebrates: evolutionary versus plastic changes


* Open access. Click on the links on the right for the PDF. I love you, Naturalis.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Wed Nov 13, 2013 2:33 pm

Helix wrote:Imma gonna leave this here and revisit it later when I feel like concentrating on good stuff. It's a review paper* on the relationship between climate change, adaptation and phenotype in terrestrial invertebrates.

Contemporary climate change and terrestrial invertebrates: evolutionary versus plastic changes


* Open access. Click on the links on the right for the PDF. I love you, Naturalis.


As ever, I thank thee.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Wed Nov 13, 2013 5:54 pm

On the subject of open access articles, you're going to love this one: Blood, sweat, and tears: a review of the hematophagous, sudophagous, and lachryphagous Lepidoptera.

Yes, it's about moths that feed on blood, sweat or tears.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Wed Nov 13, 2013 8:41 pm

Helix wrote:On the subject of open access articles, you're going to love this one: Blood, sweat, and tears: a review of the hematophagous, sudophagous, and lachryphagous Lepidoptera.

Yes, it's about moths that feed on blood, sweat or tears.

(deleted big pic)
Will down load pdf later and read.

good read re cholesterol and statins here and see sidebar for more.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/13/healt ... 31113&_r=0
Last edited by justjj on Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:03 pm

It's a burnet or forester moth (fam. Zygaenidae) in the genus Pollanisus. They're day flyers, as you can see.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Wed Nov 13, 2013 9:10 pm

Helix wrote:It's a burnet or forester moth (fam. Zygaenidae) in the genus Pollanisus. They're day flyers, as you can see.

thanks
:)
gorgeous thing.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Woollybutt » Thu Nov 14, 2013 11:37 pm

Evening folks, finally taking a chance to relax with a well-earned beer and do a great deal of very little for the evening. Work was a bit of a non-event this week, rained off for most of it and when it wasn't wet, the boss wasn't around anyway to be able to show me what horrible tasks she'd planned for me. Because I'm new on the scene, I have no idea of my way around the place, where the property boundaries are and where stuff is stored/can be found. Given the size of the place, it will be some time yet before I get it sussed. A lot of what I'm doing now and in the future doesn't really require someone to show me how to do it, unless there's a special trick/technique/reason that I need to be aware of. Finding out where to carry out the task is the biggest problem ATM. I'm sure one day when someone tells me tell me to take the first track on the left past the dead tree near the old water-tank, and then go through third gate and I'll find the broken post/wire/hole/patch of weeds (or whatever else) down in the corner where "Fred" (or whoever else I've never met nor even heard of) shot that fox a couple of years back, it will all be entirely clear and make perfect sense. No longer will I stare back blankly and start asking what tree? Near which water-tank? Where...?

Other day after work was a classic example of this. I was having a cuppa and chat with my boss and we got around to discussing the removal of a few dead Eucs amongst the hundreds planted as a windbreak on the main track in (2.5km in length from the turn-off on highway to the point where we were sitting. Can add an extra 800m or so for road overall) Boss spent nearly ten minutes trying to list all the places I'd find them. The more confused and uncertain I sounded, the more detailed she tried to be. I pointed out in a humourous and polite way that I had no idea where/what any of that meant as it was only my third time driving in. First time I was riding shot-gun in her 4WD as she chatted away while easily navigating every turn and pot-hole. Second time I was in my little car ('90 vintage Ford Laser) as I followed her 4WD, with no real idea of our final destination. All good until we got to the cattle-grid/gate. Boss got out and opened it and then drove through. Instead of stopping and waiting until I'd followed her and then closed the gate, she took off down the track and disappeared in a cloud of dust. Wasn't sure if I was supposed to keep going, or do what I've always been told about leaving gates as you find them (open or closed). I caught up...eventually... Third time was that morning, but still learning the road and wasn't taking too much notice of roadside scenery. I joked that we could have driven up and back and she could have shown me the job in half the time and made twice the sense. She laughed and apologised, reckons it's because I seem to fit in with things so well that she forgets I've only been with them a few weeks, not months. I can live with that :)

Thankfully there is an extremely useful tool called Google Earth that let's me tour all over the place of an evening and it has really helped me get my bearings. Someone at work can point to a ridge-line and tell me there's boundary fence a little way down the hill on the other side. Instead of me trying to visualise it all by imagining area and distances that are hidden from view, I can check things out from a virtual bird's eye/aerial perspective as well, and get a far more detailed understanding of the lay of the land. The ruler/path tool is neat for this. I can use it for point to point measurements, or working out circumferance and area. Pretty accurate too because I tested it in the real world against the odometer in my car and the sat-nav/GPS on my phone. What I initially thought was the size/extent and location of the place, really impressed me the first time I checked it out in GE. At the time I wondered just how far in one direction it ran before hitting a boundary. There is a very obvious geographical feature that physically defines a natural boundary, but I thought it couldn't be the actual boundary because that would make the place a lot larger than I'd imagined.Today I found out my initial thought of the geography suggesting the boundary was actually correct.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Fri Nov 15, 2013 7:16 am

Sounds like you are enjoying life, woolly. :)
Good that you can use Google Earth and other such aids as otherwise it can be a bit like running around in circles likeanemuwithonelegorf.

Do you have an idea of the area of the property in question? It does sound large from your description but being in hilly country this could be difficult to define from a standing position.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:34 pm

My "nature chat" is much more prosaic, but it doesn't stop from imagining you and yours. I follow more blogs than I did once and peoples' photographs, but hearing from old friends is always great.

You guys will enjoy knowing that I now have four bound copies of the final Heritage Agreement for my block here in the Hills. It's been a long business hasn't it; years. There have been several drafts and though I suppose it was a heap of guff and piles of paper, I have found the whole process most interesting and have learned lots.

It only remains for my signature and the Minister's for it to be finalised.

Like Teleost, having something actually happen has given me a real boost too.

Now that the watsonia control is almost within reach (ie still awful but huge progress) I am beginning to look at other things.
Last week is was cutting off and painting woody weeds with herbicide and this week I am making a start on a couple of the grasses ... annuals that have made huge growth with three successive "good years".

What else?
That's about it; the birds are fantastic (including the blackbirds ... I have found and destroyed three of their nests this year, so am hoping they get the message).

So, back to it and I look forward to hearing more another day :)

ps, same PO address there woollybutt?
have another book you might like I think.
*waves*
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Fri Nov 15, 2013 3:23 pm

Good news jj. :) Keep on keeping on.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby ms spock » Sun Nov 17, 2013 2:12 pm

Great news jj. Congrats!
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby ms spock » Sun Nov 17, 2013 2:21 pm

Woollybutt wrote:Evening folks, finally taking a chance to relax with a well-earned beer and do a great deal of very little for the evening. Work was a bit of a non-event this week, rained off for most of it and when it wasn't wet, the boss wasn't around anyway to be able to show me what horrible tasks she'd planned for me. Because I'm new on the scene, I have no idea of my way around the place, where the property boundaries are and where stuff is stored/can be found. Given the size of the place, it will be some time yet before I get it sussed. A lot of what I'm doing now and in the future doesn't really require someone to show me how to do it, unless there's a special trick/technique/reason that I need to be aware of. Finding out where to carry out the task is the biggest problem ATM. I'm sure one day when someone tells me tell me to take the first track on the left past the dead tree near the old water-tank, and then go through third gate and I'll find the broken post/wire/hole/patch of weeds (or whatever else) down in the corner where "Fred" (or whoever else I've never met nor even heard of) shot that fox a couple of years back, it will all be entirely clear and make perfect sense. No longer will I stare back blankly and start asking what tree? Near which water-tank? Where...?


LOL!

Woollybutt wrote:Other day after work was a classic example of this. I was having a cuppa and chat with my boss and we got around to discussing the removal of a few dead Eucs amongst the hundreds planted as a windbreak on the main track in (2.5km in length from the turn-off on highway to the point where we were sitting. Can add an extra 800m or so for road overall) Boss spent nearly ten minutes trying to list all the places I'd find them. The more confused and uncertain I sounded, the more detailed she tried to be. I pointed out in a humourous and polite way that I had no idea where/what any of that meant as it was only my third time driving in. First time I was riding shot-gun in her 4WD as she chatted away while easily navigating every turn and pot-hole. Second time I was in my little car ('90 vintage Ford Laser) as I followed her 4WD, with no real idea of our final destination. All good until we got to the cattle-grid/gate. Boss got out and opened it and then drove through. Instead of stopping and waiting until I'd followed her and then closed the gate, she took off down the track and disappeared in a cloud of dust. Wasn't sure if I was supposed to keep going, or do what I've always been told about leaving gates as you find them (open or closed). I caught up...eventually... Third time was that morning, but still learning the road and wasn't taking too much notice of roadside scenery. I joked that we could have driven up and back and she could have shown me the job in half the time and made twice the sense. She laughed and apologised, reckons it's because I seem to fit in with things so well that she forgets I've only been with them a few weeks, not months. I can live with that :)


:D

That is grand how it is turning out for you Woollybutt!

Great you got your car Woollybutt!

Woollybutt wrote:Thankfully there is an extremely useful tool called Google Earth that let's me tour all over the place of an evening and it has really helped me get my bearings. Someone at work can point to a ridge-line and tell me there's boundary fence a little way down the hill on the other side. Instead of me trying to visualise it all by imagining area and distances that are hidden from view, I can check things out from a virtual bird's eye/aerial perspective as well, and get a far more detailed understanding of the lay of the land. The ruler/path tool is neat for this. I can use it for point to point measurements, or working out circumferance and area. Pretty accurate too because I tested it in the real world against the odometer in my car and the sat-nav/GPS on my phone. What I initially thought was the size/extent and location of the place, really impressed me the first time I checked it out in GE. At the time I wondered just how far in one direction it ran before hitting a boundary. There is a very obvious geographical feature that physically defines a natural boundary, but I thought it couldn't be the actual boundary because that would make the place a lot larger than I'd imagined.Today I found out my initial thought of the geography suggesting the boundary was actually correct.


Great stuff!
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:17 am

https://twitter.com/Adbusters/status/40 ... 05/photo/1

Good Morning folks .. I hope you didn't miss this, like I did.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:19 pm

justjj wrote:https://twitter.com/Adbusters/status/400682044134395905/photo/1

Good Morning folks .. I hope you didn't miss this, like I did.



I miss everything on twitter and fb etc., unless someone gives me a heads up.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Mon Nov 18, 2013 2:13 pm

Today's Twitter recommendation: #WildOz. Some great Australian animal photos covering a whole range of taxa. It includes a lot of species you don't see all that often.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Mon Nov 18, 2013 2:39 pm

Helix wrote:Today's Twitter recommendation: #WildOz. Some great Australian animal photos covering a whole range of taxa. It includes a lot of species you don't see all that often.


Ta.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Tue Nov 19, 2013 6:14 am

Tim Beshara ‏@Tim_Beshara 33m

Great @bridiesmith #WildOz story about @HeardGW's research on why rare frogs are finding refuge in urban quarries.




http://www.smh.com.au/environment/anima ... 2xr19.html

and off to work I go!
cyaz :)
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby ms spock » Tue Nov 19, 2013 6:54 am



Gosh that is good to know. How fascinating.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Thu Nov 21, 2013 7:16 pm

For those who are interested in t'weather, here's the list of cyclone names for this season: http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/about/names.shtml

We will almost certainly be seeing TC Edna this season. If things get particularly lively, we might even see TC Ita.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby flying spaghetti monster » Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:15 pm

Cyclone Narelle and Trevor would be tops.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:30 pm

flying spaghetti monster wrote:Cyclone Narelle and Trevor would be tops.

Cyclone Narelle was one of last season's biggies! We'll probably get TC Trev in 2015-16.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby flying spaghetti monster » Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:44 pm

I forgot! Needs updating anyway, maybe Cyclone N'R'ylle...
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Fri Nov 22, 2013 6:42 am

There's a cyclone brewing in WA already.

Quite early really, you don't normally see them 'till mid-late December.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Woollybutt » Sat Nov 23, 2013 9:18 pm

Teleost wrote:There's a cyclone brewing in WA already.

Quite early really, you don't normally see them 'till mid-late December.


Looked impressive a couple of days ago, but now seems to have weakened heaps as it hit land.

Listening to the BoM on radio a few weeks back and heard they're forecasting/predicting this season might have two or three cyclones more than average.

As I type this I'm sitting under a slow moving thunderstorm. Gentle but persistent rain here, but further north by not much it looks like a couple of places might be copping a hammering.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Woollybutt » Wed Nov 27, 2013 10:30 pm

The term "doesn't rain but it pours" seems to apply to the less satisfying bits of life, but what's the phrase for when good things happen in a cluster?
A few days ago I was at a mate's place when another bloke dropped around asking if anyone wanted to buy a canoe. There is now a perfectly sound 13'6" jobby sitting at my place for the princely sum of $100. I paid what he paid 'coz he's moving house and doesn't want the hassle.

gallery/image.php?album_id=34&image_id=171&display=popup

Here's where story gets to really mad/coincidental/destiny or whatever. There's a bloke staying here ATM with a very nice 14" boat that caught my eye enough that I stopped to have a closer look a couple of weeks ago. Today I pulled up to say g'day and let him know I'd just bought a "boat" myself. Told me I'd done well and pointed to one of his kayaks. Scored it on eBay for rock-bottom price and was thinking of selling now only because he bought the boat and the fact his wife isn't keen on paddling (he also own another very nice kayak,far more flashthan the one he's off-loading.. I suggested instead of sticking it back on eBay, I'd get his details/give him mine and buy it myself if given a week or three to get the funds, plus I'd give him a deposit. He told me they're heading home tomorrow and I though I'd missed a chance, but better than that is he will leave the kayak here and let me fix him up next time he comes down next.

On old forum I posted a pic of a kayak was keen on, but life got in the way for a bit. This thing I am getting now is exactly what I after then. In the space of two hours I went from being stuck on land to buying a canoe to being a mini-fleet owner :). Mine is same as this, 'cept green.

http://wildernesscanoetrips.com/images/ ... e-1146.jpg

In excellent condition for 2nd (3rd?) hand and comes with a sounder and battery as well, Real shame my boss is away for a week and there isn't much work...
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Woollybutt » Wed Nov 27, 2013 10:41 pm

Dipped out on a day's work Monday 'coz of rain, so I did a bit of touristing around the place instead. Here's a pic of the Tuross River that makes me want to sing song songs about lumberjacks.

gallery/image.php?album_id=34&image_id=170&display=popup
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:02 pm

I remember you mentioning that you were thinking about getting a kayak! Good things do happen, Woolly -- you just can't predict when, how or why. :)
At the fringes of civilisation
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:33 pm

Woollybutt wrote:Dipped out on a day's work Monday 'coz of rain, so I did a bit of touristing around the place instead. Here's a pic of the Tuross River that makes me want to sing song songs about lumberjacks.


"He cuts down trees, he eats his luch, he likes to press wildflowers
He puts on womens clothing and hangs around in bars
He's a lumberjack and he's OK....." ;)

Nice work on the canoe and kayak. I really hope you enjoy them.

I went out kayak fishing with a mate a few weeks ago. I didn't enjoy it a great deal. I found sitting in the one position for 4 hours extremely hard on my back, but more difficult was not moving my bad knee for the whole time. I couldn't walk for 20 minutes when I got back to shore. To top it off, I didn't even get a bite while my mate pulled in 5 fish :(

I used to spend entire days in kayaks as a young bloke. Getting old sucks!
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Wed Nov 27, 2013 11:35 pm

Nice shot BTW.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Sun Dec 01, 2013 6:57 am

Good Morning Everyone; back in the weeding harness here.
In recent years as I have begun traveling, I've got behind looking after my own bit of bush here.
Had had a goal of covering 10% of the area each year ... (for watsonias not ALL the weeds).
Have decided to get onto it again, so my days are head down and "go"; I've just realised how long i have been here and how long I am likely to have here ... so had better make the most of it.

Trust you are all well.
*goes to make coffee and then get out and into it*
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Thu Dec 05, 2013 10:09 am

justjj wrote:Good Morning Everyone; back in the weeding harness here. ...
Trust you are all well.
*goes to make coffee and then get out and into it*
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby justjj » Fri Dec 06, 2013 2:02 am

http://www.scientificamerican.com/artic ... d-bees-are

Farmers have always depended on both honeybees and native bees to pollinate crops. As honeybees die en masse, wild bees are needed more than ever—but they, too, are disappearing. In the late 1800s naturalist Charles Robertson traveled around Carlinville, Ill., by horse and buggy, meticulously recording which bees visited which flowers. In 2009 and 2010 ecologist Laura A. Burkle, now at Montana State University, and her colleagues repeated some of Robertson's studies. The dense network of plant-pollinator relationships Robertson originally documented had deteriorated. Less than half as many interactions occurred in 2009 and 2010 as in the 1800s. Ironically, ever expanding croplands have most likely killed off local populations of native bees by depriving them of natural habitat and exposing them to toxic pesticides. And climate change has thrown off the bees' timing by shifting bloom cycles. But life is resilient: in 121 instances, Burkle observed bees attending flowers they had not pollinated in the past.
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