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Nature CHAT

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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:32 pm

Twitter's been worth watching for the biology lately. #fieldworkfail, #junkoff and #cuteoff have produced some fine tweets and photographs.

#fieldworkfail = when field work hasn't quite gone to plan
#junkoff = animal genitalia
#cuteoff = who's got the cutest study organism
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:55 pm

I can't stand Twitter but the fieldwork fails are funny.

They're probably funnier to those of us who know what field work is really like. The two most important items in my field kit are duct tape and cable ties. :)
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:06 pm

Teleost wrote:I can't stand Twitter but the fieldwork fails are funny.

They're probably funnier to those of us who know what field work is really like. The two most important items in my field kit are duct tape and cable ties. :)



My first boss told me when I asked what the state of play was; "It wasn't so long ago that I could tie you to the leg of the bench overnight".
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Wed Sep 09, 2015 10:13 pm

Hello. Been a bit busy around here. But remember we had a koala visitor in the Summer?

Image

Well, she is back. And she has a baby. No pictures at the moment. Had a really good look tonight, within a couple of feet as she sat in a tree fork, in the headlights of the car as I came in. She does not seem to be worried about us. The baby is small and crawled all over her. I considered getting out the camera, but thought the flash was probably a bit rude. I'll ask Mr buffy to watch out during the day tomorrow and see if he can get photos.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Thu Sep 10, 2015 2:24 am

Would be great to have koalas. :)
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Sat Sep 12, 2015 7:53 pm

Gardening Australia had a lovely segment on renowned WA botanist Alex George

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/video/v ... er2015.htm
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Sun Sep 13, 2015 10:07 am

Helix wrote:Gardening Australia had a lovely segment on renowned WA botanist Alex George

http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/video/v ... er2015.htm


Yes. I enjoyed that greatly. What a man. Doing what he loves.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Sat Sep 19, 2015 11:23 am

Faxcinating stuff. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-09-19/b ... gs/6785776 I wish I had taken the time to learn this fine art.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Wed Sep 23, 2015 5:52 pm

I'd love to be able to do that.

I can't even draw a decent stick figure.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Teleost » Thu Oct 01, 2015 5:50 pm

Queensland Museum Network Field Guide to Queensland Fauna App


The animals found in the Australian State of Queensland are diverse and extraordinary. Detailed descriptions of animals, maps of distribution and endangered species status combine with images to provide a valuable reference that can be used in urban, bush and coastal environments. The content has been developed by the scientists at the Queensland Museum in collaboration with scientists from our major partner, Museum Victoria, and all other Australian Museums.

This app holds descriptions of over 560 species encompassing birds, fishes, frogs, lizards, snakes, mammals, turtles, freshwater, marine and terrestrial invertebrates, spiders and insects including butterflies. From animals found on Queensland’s coral reefs, in rock-pools, in tropical rainforests, in deserts and in the suburbs, the habitats are hugely varied but only represent a tiny fraction of the true diversity of life in this large State. Our scientists will continue to add new species and refine this app over time.

The Queensland Museum Network acknowledges funding provided through the Commonwealth Government’s Inspiring Australia Unlocking Australia’s Potential grant program which has allowed us to provide this app free to download and use.



http://www.qm.qld.gov.au/Learning+Resources/Apps/QMN+Field+Guide+to+Queensland+Fauna+App#.VgzV6JevWBt
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby nut » Fri Oct 02, 2015 9:40 am

Got up early and went fishing in Victoria Park, Ballarat. No one about and no fish but it was very nice.

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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Sat Oct 03, 2015 6:36 am

Lovely photo. Looks like a nice spot to be not catching any.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Sat Oct 03, 2015 9:40 am

Image
seedling #3

Image
seedling #2

Image
seedling #1

Self sown Eremophila seedlings. Three of threm. I'm amazed. It has only taken 24 years since I planted this spot with various Eremophila species. These look likely to be seedlings of E. maculata. Though there are at least 12 different species planted in the spot. Well, at least it looks that way. These could possibly be suckers from roots. Only science could tell.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Sat Oct 03, 2015 12:27 pm

I hope this page is readable to all.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/roughbark ... 6654450444
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby sci_fi » Thu Oct 08, 2015 2:05 pm

Nice shot roughie.
My philotheca is in full flight at moment 11/2mx11/2m.
Keep those shots coming
sf
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Peak Warming Man » Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:26 pm

Bump.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:55 pm

What are you doing over here PWM? Just being helpful?
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Peak Warming Man » Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:59 pm

>>What are you doing over here PWM? Just being helpful?

I check in periodically, it hadn't moved for days so I nudged it.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:57 pm

It has a bit of a habit of doing that.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Fri Oct 16, 2015 1:03 am

Peak Warming Man wrote:I check in periodically, it hadn't moved for days so I nudged it.


You could've nudged it by sharing some int'restin' titbit, you know.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Fri Oct 16, 2015 6:48 am

Helix wrote:
Peak Warming Man wrote:I check in periodically, it hadn't moved for days so I nudged it.


You could've nudged it by sharing some int'restin' titbit, you know.

Indeed. I see that a flooded gum on the Swan has been heritage listed.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Sat Oct 17, 2015 9:40 am

I've tried to send off a record form to Fungimap.
Think that may have worked but gmail wasn't allowing me to attach more than one image.

Anyway, I believe it is Polyporus. It could be either P.arcularius or P. brumalis. Though it is spring, P. brumalis seems more likely. Though according to ALA, there is only one recording of P. brumalis.

Pictures appearing here. https://www.flickr.com/photos_user.gne? ... &details=1
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Sat Oct 17, 2015 4:13 pm

Went wandering in the bush while Mr buffy ran the slasher over the tracks. It looks dry and boring over there at Digby. I got a reasonable photo of a pink fingers orchid:

Image

I actually took about 8 or 9 shots, but there was just enough breeze to make the things move. So I got good clear backgrounds of leaf litter and orchids that looked like ghosts. There is a Senecio of some sort there too, seems to be one with red stems and one with green stems, but otherwise similar. I have no idea if they are 'locals' but I would presume so.

Image Image

But even though it looked really boring and there were really very few splashes of colour, I went ahead with my usual practice of writing down what I did see in flower. Quite a long list, actually....Glossodia major (wax lip orchid); Burchadia umbellata (milkmaids); Goodenia geniculata; Viola hederacea (ivy leaf violet); Viola betonicifolia (showy violet); Athropodium strictum (chocolate lily); Microseris (yam daisy); Brachyschome (daisy); Hibbertia (well, one of them, too hard to spend too much time deciding which one!); Ghania radula (thatch saw sedge); Leptospermum myrsinoides (silky tea tree); Melaleuca squarrosa (paperbark); Pratia pedunculata (matted pratia); Comosperma volubile (love creeper); Kennedia prostrata (running postman); Boronia muelleri (forest boronia); Patersonia glabrata (purple flags); Lomandra longifolia/filiformis/nana (not sure which one); Stackhousia monogyna (creamy candles); Thysanotis patersonii (twining fringe lily); Chamaescilla corymbosa (blue squill).

You got that list because I've been really slack about remembering names of flowers lately, and I need to write them down. Actually I need to hand write rather than type, because that is the way my brain works.

But it still looked fairly plain and boring, because the flowers were few and far between. What we need is a good soaking rain to wake things up. Even our swamp area is dry as dust.

I also did a Mini Massacre of some of these that I found growing near the gate:

Image

That photo is from some years ago in a different part of the block. I haven't found them again in that spot (although I should go and look now, it's a month or so since I checked). Today I suspect the new ones came in with the trucks when the shed was put up. Not to worry. They are now sweating to death in a plastic bag, including their bulbs, and will go into the rubbish. I think I missed one bulb, so I'll watch for it to try again.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Sun Oct 18, 2015 8:07 am

That's a good list you've prepared there, buffy.

Yes, if you don't use it you lose it is quite true about remembering plant names. Keeping records is a very good practice.

As for your African orchid, it is spread by wind. If it is anywhere near it will spread far and wide. It is vitally important for individuals to keep on its back and destroy every specimen sighted carefully.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby *jj* » Sun Oct 18, 2015 4:38 pm

Your plant list looks very like mine, buffy, including that Disa bastarda.

There are different points of view about control.
I'm glad you can catch it early and it is very distinctive so you have a good chance at eradicating it.

In my case it is so widespread that the time and effort to control it is likely better spent on such things as erica etc though I do pull up and squash whatever I find.

This year's grass to go is the sweet verdant, which is bulking up quite heavily after years of being ignored in favour of watsonias.
Can't do everything.
I am still working on weeding out from individual valuable plants.

Right now have a heap of tiny Hakea and Mount Lofty Pine (Callitris rhomboidea) seedlings planted out and needing watering every few days to try to get them through the summer ... it's a huge job, but if I can pull it off it will be worth the effort.
They are needed asap to replace the cover lost by digging out the ericas.
That's about it I think
Cheers.
:)
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Mon Oct 19, 2015 1:47 pm

When one is weeding out the couch and fumitory from around the huge clumps one planted as babies years ago of Ghania sieberiana, one should

(a) wear a singlet top
(b) wear a short sleeved t-shirt
(c) wear long sleeves

Every time, every time, even when I remember to wear the long sleeves, I get the welts on the outsides of my forearms! And today I wore a t-shirt - idiot!! Actually, I was spending all my psychic energy on repelling any reptilian inhabitants, which I've never seen and don't want to find.

I think the common name, which includes the words "saw" and "sedge" should probably have told me....

Image Image Image

I have to get in there between the sedges and the wire fence. When they were smaller, I crawled along, but today I just bent over and pulled. There is less weeds each year as the sedges get more enormous, but they still need a little bit of weeding. Those photos are from a few years ago, but it does pretty much look like that now, although a bit less green, as of the last two weeks when the sun decided to get hot suddenly.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Mon Oct 19, 2015 6:28 pm

Gawd, Gahnia is awful to work around! I've got to cut back Millaa Millaa vine from the driveway, but it hasn't fruited yet. I'd quite like to get some berries off it, but maybe not this season.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Mon Oct 19, 2015 9:05 pm

*jj* wrote:Your plant list looks very like mine, buffy, including that Disa bastarda.

There are different points of view about control.
I'm glad you can catch it early and it is very distinctive so you have a good chance at eradicating it.

In my case it is so widespread that the time and effort to control it is likely better spent on such things as erica etc though I do pull up and squash whatever I find.

This year's grass to go is the sweet verdant, which is bulking up quite heavily after years of being ignored in favour of watsonias.
Can't do everything.
I am still working on weeding out from individual valuable plants.

Right now have a heap of tiny Hakea and Mount Lofty Pine (Callitris rhomboidea) seedlings planted out and needing watering every few days to try to get them through the summer ... it's a huge job, but if I can pull it off it will be worth the effort.
They are needed asap to replace the cover lost by digging out the ericas.
That's about it I think
Cheers.
:)

Callitris are going to benefit from Callitris mulch specifically, if you can find a place to gather it and lay it back as you found it. Same with any native species, really.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Mon Oct 19, 2015 9:06 pm

Helix wrote:Gawd, Gahnia is awful to work around! I've got to cut back Millaa Millaa vine from the driveway, but it hasn't fruited yet. I'd quite like to get some berries off it, but maybe not this season.

OH&S says, wear protection.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Mon Oct 19, 2015 10:34 pm

roughbarked wrote:
Helix wrote:Gawd, Gahnia is awful to work around! I've got to cut back Millaa Millaa vine from the driveway, but it hasn't fruited yet. I'd quite like to get some berries off it, but maybe not this season.

OH&S says, wear protection.


lol
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Tue Oct 20, 2015 12:17 pm

Spring or winter polypore?

I've tagged these as Polyporus arcularius but I'm unsure as they tend to better fit P. brumalis. The problems are;

No fringed margin

white stem or mostly white that does darken when hardening.

and oddly, this occurs mainly in spring at my location.


P. arcularius is Spring Polypore


P. brumalis is Winter Polypore and has only one record on ALA. Which clearly may be held in doubt.

ImageSpring or winter polypore? by roughbarked, on Flickr

Image

Image

Image
It is now Spring but this looks more like Winter Polypore?

Image

Image

Image

These measure up tp 60 mm caps.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Sat Oct 24, 2015 2:22 pm

Went Disa weed hunting again today. Didn't find any. This is a Good Thing, because I was checking where I'd seen them (and destroyed them) before. The bush is crackly dry already. We are well under average rainfall for the year.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Tue Oct 27, 2015 10:41 am

Now that the Nationals have the Murray-Darling Basin Plan under the "it's a joke Joyce" tag, what will become of it all?


October 27, 2015 Griffith Business Chamber vice president Paul Pierotti has told the Senate hearing into the Murray-Darling Basin Plan it is “ineffective and disruptive”.


October 27, 2015 GRIFFITH Mayor John Dal Broi told the Senate hearing into the Murray-Darling Basin Plan he believed the district had lost 30 per cent of its water.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Sun Nov 01, 2015 12:34 pm

We had a visitor to the backyard last evening, found by Long (The Pug). Beautiful, healthy, relatively fast blue-tongue lizard. Mr buffy was out of his beanbag and outside very quickly when he thought The Pug was playing with a snake....

Anyway, the lizard hissed, The Pug nosed, the lizard hissed, The Pug nosed. We put The Pug into his yard, got some gloves and handed the lizard into next door through the fence. It should be safer there. There is a family of them in Annies yard, I'm hoping that one belonged and we didn't start a war.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Fri Nov 06, 2015 1:03 am

Nice to have a blue-tongue around, Buffy.

I've seen more snakes this week than I saw all last month. A brown snake, a black snake, two lovely carpet snakes (one 2m long) and a brown tree snake. All of a sudden, they're everywhere. At least, they're obvious.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Fri Nov 06, 2015 7:26 am

I've seen more dead than live snakes on the road. Not that I run over them. The lady next door said her dog had killed two and that it was my fault because I didn't have a yard full of nothing but well mown kike.
I told her to train the dog not to kill my blue-tounge and Bearded dragons.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby *jj* » Wed Nov 18, 2015 7:14 pm

ahhh, have just caught up with news of the fires in WA.
Was over there not so long ago and saw some of Kingy's country ... so many issues.
Have to say it; I am so grateful for all the volunteers like him, as well as the paid emergency services people.

There were a couple of callouts within 8K of here yesterday and three others closer in thepast two weeks (mostly careless backyard burnoffs) but they were kept very small and dealt with quickly because we are so close to such good services ... the kiddo with me was entranced at all the air action ... two light aircraft and a helicopter!
Perfect for a nearly 3YO.
:)

It was, however, quite the wake-up call for me, hence my post; I am not nearly "ready" yet, but have put in a big effort today and crossed lots more off the list.

The birds are hanging around all the bird baths just now, beaks open, wings extended, panting AND establishing pecking / bathing orders even though only November.
Guess they aren't used to the sudden warm weather.
Signing off and wishing you all safe and well.
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Going batty

Postby Helix » Sun Nov 22, 2015 7:43 pm

I visited the Tolga Bat Hospital today. They are doing a fantastic job with a very large number of orphaned and injured mega- and microbats.

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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby *jj* » Mon Nov 23, 2015 7:48 am

Perfect timing Helix.
Thank you
H here, now 15, is passionate about caring for animals and focuses on Australia Zoo and PETA whose very inviting online presence make it easy for him to be busy there and not notice other organisations.

Am keen to encourage his interests AND on widening his awareness of others who care for animals.
It's a big family, isn't it.

His other grandparents run Minton Farm, so he's learning heaps through them.

The book and sponsorship etc will be part of his Christmas present and will work on holding out the hope of visiting one day.
There are tiny bats of some kind at his place (and mine, but I can't spot them), so ... there's always something to work on isn't there.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Wed Nov 25, 2015 7:46 pm

jj - are you OK today? I've been at work. I can see fires in the Barossa. Haven't really had time to look at anywhere else. Only minor stuff here, but the garden has taken a battering from the wind. There is plenty of kindling to be stacked up away from the house. Eucalypts can be so generous. And we paid for the gutters to be cleaned yesterday. I guess Jamie gets to do it again faster than expected!
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Wed Nov 25, 2015 7:47 pm

I just bought a bat box last week. I'm still thinking about where to place it. I've seen microbats here, in my garden shed and one overnighted in the big shed once. I guess I can just hang it highish in one of the gum trees.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Wed Nov 25, 2015 9:01 pm

buffy wrote:I just bought a bat box last week. I'm still thinking about where to place it. I've seen microbats here, in my garden shed and one overnighted in the big shed once. I guess I can just hang it highish in one of the gum trees.


I remember when you had the bat in the shed!

I was thinking about a bat box to provide an alternative site for the eastern long-eared bats that are roosting intermittently under the patio roof. But then I wondered whether that would just be a buffet for the brown tree snakes.

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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby roughbarked » Thu Nov 26, 2015 9:13 am

Would hollow logs the size of budgies nests do? I've got too many of those now that the budgies are slowly dying of old age.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby fsm » Thu Nov 26, 2015 10:27 am

A visitor on the back wall last night.

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Two + two equals fish.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby Helix » Thu Nov 26, 2015 7:07 pm

fsm wrote:A visitor on the back wall last night.

273


Nice!
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby *jj* » Thu Nov 26, 2015 9:16 pm

good evening all,
The fires are well north of here.
Yesterday was awful; very sharp gusts of hot wind brought a few standing dead tree branches down
Have finally got most things set up "just in case"

I'm shocked at the intensity of the fires given they're in cropping /grazing farmland.
Much of it would have been reaped I'd have thought.
I don't understand it.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby buffy » Fri Nov 27, 2015 7:14 am

Pleased to read you jj.

I did see a lot of bales of hay/straw in the conflagration pictures. So perhaps the heads were off and the straw baled. And I guess that's a grassfire for you. Very fast. Very furious. I recall going to a getting ready for the fire season thing at the local CFA here many years ago and they were showing videos of bushfires. That am't what we will have here. We've got a big grassy plain. The guys tell me you simply can't drive the trucks fast enough to keep up with it.
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby *jj* » Sat Nov 28, 2015 10:15 am

Thanks buffy, yes.
And maybe some of the straw was still standing.

A Barossa based person was saying the other day that improved varieties are giving heavier production /closer plantings etc so maybe more fuel as well.
I'm not sure exactly the context of the reported convo (other than the intensity of the fires "for grass")

Lately I have been traveling that area / route through to the Clare Valley, taking the Goyder HIghway in particular with Harry , who has become interested in his life / work.

I must say I had only ever really learned about "Goyder's Line" at school, but nothing of his life.
It's an amazing story and I have been re-reading Janis Sheldrick's "Nature's Line : George Goyder"

Have also just read Reginals Spriggs' story ... http://www.kristinweidenbach.com/books/ ... ck-legend/
Needs to be read with broader knoweldge of Oz indigenous history, as you'd expect.

Am slowly (painfully) getting through "Why Warriors Lie Down ... " by Richard Trudgen ...

That's about it from here ... blackberry cutting and painting today.
:)
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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby nut » Sat Dec 05, 2015 5:14 pm

Took my camera out for a run this morning for the first time in living memory. You get rusty when you haven't used something for a long time.

Here be Ibis early morning.

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Re: Nature CHAT

Postby nut » Sat Dec 05, 2015 5:24 pm

Only took my 400mm zoom out on the lake so this little greeting was taken with my phone.
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Morning dreaming...
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