-Filter Forums-
Loading posts...

Colorful Honey

Na

Colorful Honey

Postby fsm » Fri May 03, 2013 10:38 pm

Beekeepers in northeastern France found themselves in a sticky situation after bees from their hives began producing honey in shades of blue and green.

The colored honey could not be sold because it did not meet France's standards of honey production: It was not obtained from the nectar of plants and it deviates from the standard coloring of honey (nearly colorless to dark brown).

That's bad news for a region that produces a thousand tons of honey a year and has already had to cope with a high bee mortality rate and low honey production after a harsh winter. An investigation by beekeepers in the town of Ribeauville uncovered the cause of the problem... Colorful Honey
Two + two equals fish.
User avatar
fsm
 
Posts: 463
Images: 146
Location: Central Coast, NSW
Blog: View Blog (1)

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby justjj » Sat May 04, 2013 10:30 am

It sounds like a failure of marketing, doesn't it.

someone else might have invented various colours of honey to great advantage :)

(only joking .. the thought of facing coloured honey doesn't do it for me, but I bet in a savvy marketing firm's hands it could be big time something-other-than-Honey)
justjj
 
Posts: 803
Images: 0
Blog: View Blog (1)

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby roughbarked » Sat May 04, 2013 10:37 am

Not sure.. as if one closes one's eyes it still tastes like honey.

Not like vanilla coke or creamy cheesy vegemite?
roughbarked
 
Posts: 886
Images: 2

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby mollwollfumble » Sat May 04, 2013 6:02 pm

Was reading just a few days ago that there is not a single species of plant in the whole of the world that has evolved to rely on the honeybee for pollination.
mollwollfumble
 
Posts: 89

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby Helix » Sat May 04, 2013 7:19 pm

mollwollfumble wrote:Was reading just a few days ago that there is not a single species of plant in the whole of the world that has evolved to rely on the honeybee for pollination.


That might well be true, but I can't imagine that it was tested exhaustively. The honey bee has a huge native range, which overlaps with an enormous variety of flowering plants. Can you remember where you read it?
At the fringes of civilisation
Helix
 
Posts: 969
Images: 17

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby roughbarked » Sat May 04, 2013 11:24 pm

Helix wrote:
mollwollfumble wrote:Was reading just a few days ago that there is not a single species of plant in the whole of the world that has evolved to rely on the honeybee for pollination.


That might well be true, but I can't imagine that it was tested exhaustively. The honey bee has a huge native range, which overlaps with an enormous variety of flowering plants. Can you remember where you read it?


There weren't any plants in Australia that evolved to be pollinated by the European bees. That part is true. The point is though that there are native bees on most land masses.
I'd be more inclined to think that bees evolved to make use of the abundant pollen from flowers which may well originally have evolved to be wind pollinated but adapted and evolved with the many insects that also evolved.

this from http://www.seeds.ca/sweb/book/export/html/204
The co-evolution of insects and flowers is reflected in the diversity among pollinators. To pollinate a flower, pollinators must visit and forage in such a way, within a specific period, that viable pollen is transferred to other flowers. Individual flowers must reward, but not satiate, visitors so that they carry pollen to other flowers of the same species. The correct insect anatomical and behavioural fit and floral advertisement and rewards are required. Many flowers are effectively pollinated by a diversity of animals. Very few plants are pollinated by a single species. An insect must be a frequent floral visitor in order to be effective. Because a plant only requires its pollinators for short periods of the year, these insects must either forage at other plants or shorten their adult life and schedule it to that particular flowering period.

The plant-insect relationship is now in peril because of the many threats facing pollinators with the most specialized relationships being the most vulnerable to disruption.
roughbarked
 
Posts: 886
Images: 2

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby Helix » Sat May 04, 2013 11:37 pm

None of that addresses the issue of honeybees (Apis mellifera) and whether any species of plant has coevolved with that species to the point that the plant is entirely dependent on it for successful pollination.
At the fringes of civilisation
Helix
 
Posts: 969
Images: 17

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby roughbarked » Sat May 04, 2013 11:51 pm

Helix wrote:None of that addresses the issue of honeybees (Apis mellifera) and whether any species of plant has coevolved with that species to the point that the plant is entirely dependent on it for successful pollination.



True.
roughbarked
 
Posts: 886
Images: 2

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby justjj » Sun May 05, 2013 10:14 am

mollwollfumble wrote:Was reading just a few days ago that there is not a single species of plant in the whole of the world that has evolved to rely on the honeybee for pollination.


I've been searching to no avail, but maybe duckduckgo, google et al know that I might not believe it, even if I find it.

It seems an extraordinarily sweeping claim.

But I did find this.
:)

http://biologicalexceptions.blogspot.co ... chive.html

:)
justjj
 
Posts: 803
Images: 0
Blog: View Blog (1)

Re: Colorful Honey

Postby roughbarked » Sun May 05, 2013 10:57 am

I thought the link you found explains it well. The endothemic thing attracts night flying beetles specifically but bees belong to a plethora of insects that seek food by daylight and hence are part of a wide group that are mainly attracted by colour. This would indicate that the specialised thing about bees is their social ability which doesn't rely upon specialisation by plants. If anything the reason why we believe bees are so necessary is that we have the ability to move the bee societies to within range of crops. So in fact it is us who have evolved to see bees as special pollinators.
roughbarked
 
Posts: 886
Images: 2


Return to Nature

cron