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Drawing the line

PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2014 8:39 pm
by *jj*
From a science site that I love; on the ethics of deciding about photographing subjects.

http://blog.mosaicscience.com/drawing-the-line/

Re: Drawing the line

PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 11:20 pm
by nut
Interesting. I often feel I am intruding as an observer in an activity, that is what this is yes?

Re: Drawing the line

PostPosted: Fri Oct 03, 2014 11:56 am
by Helix
nut wrote:Interesting. I often feel I am intruding as an observer in an activity, that is what this is yes?


I think so, nut, but maybe the article goes further than that -- the power imbalance of the photographer and the photographed; the ethics of capturing an image of someone in a terrible situation for the benefit other people; preserving the dignity of an individual reduced to 'the subject'; and the issue of informed consent.

Most of us don't have to worry about that. Although the last might sometimes apply. I think it includes posting photos of minors without permission from their parents.

ETA: I might be over-thinking it.

Re: Drawing the line

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 11:17 am
by *jj*
Helix wrote:
nut wrote:Interesting. I often feel I am intruding as an observer in an activity, that is what this is yes?


I think so, nut, but maybe the article goes further than that -- the power imbalance of the photographer and the photographed; the ethics of capturing an image of someone in a terrible situation for the benefit other people; preserving the dignity of an individual reduced to 'the subject'; and the issue of informed consent.

Most of us don't have to worry about that. Although the last might sometimes apply. I think it includes posting photos of minors without permission from their parents.

ETA: I might be over-thinking it.


My reading of it includes both of those messages, but the extension into what Helix mentions is more to the heart of it, most notably when photographing people.

Photographing any animate "subject" will almost always "contaminate" some element of things if we want to drill very deeply, but I think it is a cleaner / less complicated issue in this case of "rights", and more specifically human rights* I suppose.

I am thinking It has chiefly to do with the business of distinguishing between the subject of the image as the subject (which I am loading with "ie respectufully / with respect") and the subject as an (any available (suits my purpose)) object.



* there are other rights ... I've only recently become aware of photographers using their bird ID apps to play the birds' calls in order to attract them :(

Re: Drawing the line

PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:47 pm
by Teleost
Yep.

Having been to India, I can fully relate with what he's saying.

There are powerful images everywhere and it's important to be aware that your "winning shot" is of someone else's life (or death).

Western tourists in that part of the world often treat the place a bit like a theme park and when they see something that to them is novel and amazing such as kids picking through mountains of garbage or the cremation of the dead on the riverbanks, their first reaction is to start snapping away. For some reason it doesn't seem to penetrate that they wouldn't want complete strangers turning up and taking photos at the funeral of one of their loved ones.

Sometimes taking a photograph is just innapropriate.

Re: Drawing the line

PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:42 am
by roughbarked
My son refuses to allow any photograph of his children to be published on the internet without his control as to who can see it. My daughter is quite the opposite. The children are mostly yet too young to know exactly what it is all about.